ILR At SaddleBrooke
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ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERS

Registration for 2022 winter/spring classes is open. Classes are shown below. You may need to scroll down to see all the classes.

ILR Covid-19 precautions: due to the rapid expansion of the Covid-19 omicron variant the ILR has decided that masks will be mandatory for all winter/spring classes. Please DO NOT register for a class if you are not willing to abide by this requirement. Note: presenters are not required to wear a mask but may if they wish.

A description of all the classes is available by clicking on List of Classes in the menu bar above.

You must be a subscriber and you must be logged in to register for a class.

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Note: you must be a subscriber to register for a class. If you are not yet a subscriber, please join before trying to register. Also, you must be logged in to register for a class.

Current Classes - information and registration

    • 10 Jan 2022
    • 07 Feb 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-101 THE IMPRESSIONISTS PART I (REPEAT)

    Laurie Brussel, Mondays, 10 am to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: January 10, 17, 24, 31, February 7

    Through the expertise of a renowned Art Historian on video covering over a 100 beautifully reproduced works of art and the expertise of a resident artist, this course will include a chronological and biographical study of the early Impressionist artists, their genius, their lives and styles. The Impressionists Part I will encompass the life and works of Edouard Manet through to Berthe Morisot including such prominent Impressionists as Claude Monet, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Paul Cezanne, and Camille Pissarro. We will closely examine Manet, both his works and influence on a group of young painters wanting to push their work further and further into depicting modern life, a group that will come to be known as the Impressionists. We will examine what made their paintings so unique, their brush strokes, composition, and emphasis on light.   

    Note: The instructor requires the wearing of a mask to attend this class.


    • 10 Jan 2022
    • 14 Feb 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 8
    Register

    22-102 HOW SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERIES AND TECHNOLOGIES HAVE IMPROVED DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC MEDICINE (UPDATED REPEAT)

    Ken Marich, Mondays, 2 to 4 pm

    Sonoran Room: January 10, 17, 24, 31, February 7, 14

    How will technology affect your health?  The course will present an overview of existing and new technologies that are used to diagnose and treat diseases.  Specific areas of interest will include great scientists and their discoveries, organ systems, laboratory medicine (blood tests), medical imaging, organ transplantation, bacterial and viral infections, vaccines, regenerative medicine, stem cell therapy, prosthetics, robotics, cardiology and oncology advances, the enhanced role of your pharmacist and a look to future innovations. 


    • 11 Jan 2022
    • 08 Feb 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 2
    Register

    22-103 THE ROARING TWENTIES: A DECADE OF SOCIAL & POLITICAL CHANGE (NEW)

    Ann Kuperberg, Tuesdays, 10 am to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: January 11, 18, 25, February 1, 8

    The Roaring 20’s abandoned previous restrictive lifestyles for liberated, inventive and prosperous times. In this 5-week course, we will discuss the changes and their impact on politics, women voters, entertainment, new celebrities, in literature, music and sports.  People like F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charlie Chaplin, Louis Armstrong, Babe Ruth and even Al Capone, will be highlighted.  The availability of automobiles, radio and more home inventions added to the atmosphere. There will be short DVD selections where appropriate and weekly handouts as well as class interaction. 


    • 11 Jan 2022
    • 15 Feb 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-104 TRUTH, JUSTICE AND ACCOUNTABILITY (UPDATED REPEAT)

    Paul Frederickson, Tuesdays, 1 to 3 pm

    Sonoran Room: January 11, 18, 25, February 1, 8, 15

    This course will examine numerous historically significant court cases from the past 100 years.  We will use the cases to review and discuss several important individual and societal issues.  Major course topics will include: 1) What is justice? 2) How do we know right from wrong? 3) What is a lie? 4) How should liars be held accountable? 5) Who should be held accountable for injuries caused by Coca-Cola, hot coffee, guns, tobacco, opioids, and more? We will use history, philosophy, ethics, and law to analyze these complex and controversial topics.


    • 12 Jan 2022
    • 09 Feb 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-105 CSI SADDLEBROOKE (REPEAT)

    Bart Epstein, Wednesdays, 10 am to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 9

    The instructor, a forensic scientist for the State of Minnesota for 32 years, will present a survey of what can and cannot be done in a forensic science laboratory. The class will introduce the participants to different types of evidence and their value as well as how they are used in court. Material will be presented by lecture and demonstration as well as participants actually doing some forensic work in class. Numerous actual cases will be presented and discussed.


    • 12 Jan 2022
    • 16 Feb 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 14
    Register

    22-106 MINERALS AND GEMS (UPDATED REPEAT)

    Harlan Clare, Wednesdays, 2 to 4 pm

    Sonoran Room: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 9, 16

    Minerals and gems can be beautiful, but did you know that many of the products you use today come from common minerals? Come join us and learn about common, and not so common, minerals. You will participate in hands-on activities and demonstrations, while learning how and why minerals are different and how they are used or feared. Find out how minerals can be altered to enhance their value. All of these topics will increase your appreciation of specimens when you attend the Tucson Mineral, Gem and Fossil Showcase, the largest of its kind in the world, in Tucson, Arizona. As an optional experience, the instructor will provide some venue tours based on vendor availability.

    Note: The instructor requires the wearing of a mask to attend this class.

    • 13 Jan 2022
    • 10 Feb 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • HOA 1 Activity Center
    • 6
    Register

    22-107 THE IMPACT OF THE SCANDINAVIAN VIKINGS ON EUROPE AND ELSEWHERE (NEW)

    Ken Lund, Thursdays, 10 am to 12 noon

    HOA 1 Activity Center: January 13, 20, 27, February 3, 10

    The Vikings came from Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. They were traders, marauders, farmers, and colonizers. Their Viking culture can be found in many nations, as well as their DNA. They founded cities, named nations, and changed the world over a 300-year period. The word "egg" is Old Norse. Come learn about a group of people who left an impact on the world that is just now being realized. How many of us may have Viking DNA in our ancestral genes?


    • 21 Jan 2022
    • 18 Feb 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-109 COSMOLOGY:  FUNDAMENTALS AND LATEST ADVANCES (NEW)

    Lockwood Carlson, Fridays, 10 to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: January 21, 28, February 4

    Catalina Room: February 11, 18

    This course offers a basic introduction to cosmology including expansion of the universe, dark matter, dark energy, horizons, black holes, big bang, inflation and more.  Our approach emphasizes historical development and the key people involved.  We will also cover the latest advances in understanding, especially the current major discoveries and theoretical explanations, remaining major issues in the field, and leading-edge research in astronomy and physics.  The level of the course will be “Scientific American.”  Curiosity is required. Math is not.


    • 21 Feb 2022
    • 21 Mar 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 6
    Register

    22-110 THE STORY BEHIND THE COMPLETION OF AMERICA’S FIRST NATIONAL PROJECT – THE TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD (REPEAT)

    Gerry Miller, Mondays, 10 am to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21

    The building of the world's first transcontinental railroad (i.e., America's Transcontinental Railroad (TCRR)) was a vast, unprecedented feat of engineering.  It was also a profoundly historic event in American history.  When you consider that the first 13 miles of track in the U.S. were completed in August of 1830, the concept of building a railroad all the way across the United States just 39 years later seemed impossible to most Americans.  But the Railroad Act of 1862 set the wheels in motion to do just that.  This class will describe the political, economic, engineering, and special personnel (i.e., Chinese) involved in completing this approximately 2,000-mile railroad.   When completed the TCRR introduced some major changes to the way of life in the U.S. including reducing travel time between the west coast and east coast from 3 months to 6 days, introducing time zones, creating a new class of American worker called the white-collar class, and spurring new inventions such as stronger bridges.


    • 21 Feb 2022
    • 28 Mar 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 32
    Register

    22-111 OUR AMAZING VISUAL SYSTEM (UPDATED REVISED)

    Bob Springer, Mondays, 1 pm to 3 pm

    Sonoran Room: February 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21,

    Changes in Our Vision As We Age

    Our visual system is amazingly complex.  We “Look” with our eyes, but we “See” with our brains.  Vision requires so much processing that we use half of our brain to see.

    We will discuss the effects of aging on our visual perception in detail. We will examine presbyopia making it harder to read small print after about age 40. We address a recent problem: developing nearsightedness and dry eye which we get by looking so frequently at our digital laptop and cell phone screens.  We will discuss cataracts which many of us will get. We will also study macular degeneration, glaucoma, and vitreous and retinal detachment. 

    Once we gain an understanding of these problems that occur as we grow older, we will discuss the significant advances that have been made in treating each of these.

    This course will also review the basic physiology of the visual system and explore concepts such as spatial vision, depth perception, and the perception of motion. We will view many interesting illusions and other intriguing phenomena.

     


    • 22 Feb 2022
    • 22 Mar 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 13
    Register

    22-112 CHAUCER AND THE CANTERBURY TALES (REPEAT)

    Linda Griffin, Tuesdays, 10 am to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22

    Geoffrey Chaucer is a writer for all ages. He wrote in a time much like our own: "wracked by wars, labor disputes, high taxes, and dangerous new ideas."  He had a fascinating life and wrote one of the best-known works in English literature, The Canterbury Tales. We will look at his life and this major work. Participants will be assigned a character whose tale they will tell, thus not having to read all the tales. However, everyone will read the Prologue and Retraction. We will study characterization and other points of analysis in the tales, as well as seeing relationships between the tales. We may even take a short walking journey to simulate the journey of Chaucer and his companions.  Students may use any English edition of The Canterbury Tales.  A fun course! 


    • 22 Feb 2022
    • 22 Mar 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-113 RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN: PERFECTING THE AMERICAN MUSICAL FORM IN TIMELESS SONGS (NEW)

    Gail Nelli, Tuesdays 2 to 4 pm

    Sonoran Room: February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22

    From their groundbreaking production of Oklahoma! in 1943 until their final collaboration on The Sound of Music in 1959, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II created more unforgettable standards in the Great American Songbook than any other musical theatre song writers. The rich melodies and evocative lyrics of their songs are deeply embedded in the memories of most Americans. Who doesn’t know a song by Rodgers and Hammerstein? Please come join in the journey of these two musical theatre masters, discovering more about their personalities, their collaborative style, and their resulting gift of songs.

    Note: The instructor requires the wearing of a mask to attend this class.

    • 23 Feb 2022
    • 30 Mar 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 33
    Register

    22-114 POLITICAL/MILITARY EVENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AMERICA DOMINATES THE WORLD STAGE (REPEAT)

    Mark Schwartz, Wednesdays, 10 to 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 23, March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

    This course will Illuminate and relate activist events and trends in US foreign policy that impacted world history from World War II through the Cold War (either good or bad). Some events are well-known (Cuban Missile Crisis), while others are footnotes in history and public awareness (Sinking of the Reuben James).


    • 23 Feb 2022
    • 30 Mar 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-115 THE SONG REMEMBERS WHEN (NEW)

    Susan Kravitz, Wednesdays, 1 to 3 pm

    Sonoran Room: February 23, March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

    This popular country song evokes the power of music.  Why is it that hearing certain songs from our earlier life evoke detailed memories?  Why do we experience powerful emotions when listening to certain kinds of music?  Answers come from the study of cognitive neuroscience, the field of study that draws from neurology, psychology, and anthropology. Breakthroughs in understanding how music is processed in the brain will enlighten our understanding of music’s role in human evolution and adaptation. Music can be harnessed to stimulate memory, improve mood, enhance physical conditioning and coordination, and generally improve the quality of life.

    There will be many music selections taken from different genres, time periods, and cultures for us to consider and understand how and why they enhance the human condition.  Music will be both live and pre-recorded.  This is a very interactive course.


    • 24 Feb 2022
    • 31 Mar 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Cactus Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    22-116 GEOLOGY OF ARIZONA LANDSCAPES (REPEAT)

    Karen Gray, Thursdays, 10 to 12 noon

    Cactus Room: February 24, March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31

    This class will examine the three different geologic regions of Arizona, and then discuss the geology of five areas in detail. The areas are the Catalina Mountains, Tucson Mountains, the Grand Canyon, Sedona, and northern Arizona, including several of our beautiful National Parks. There will be three optional field trips: 1) Catalina State Park about 2 1/2 hrs; 2) Catalina Mountains from the base to the top (an all-day car trip with eight stops); 3) Tucson Mountains which includes four short hikes (some with elevation) to examine features of the volcanic range. This will be an all-day excursion. The dates and times for the field trips will be determined by class consensus. Each participant is required to sign a waiver for each of the field trips.

    Note: The instructor requires the wearing of a mask to attend this class.

    • 25 Feb 2022
    • 01 Apr 2022
    • 6 sessions
    • Cactus Room
    • 6
    Register

    22-117 THE HISTORY OF THE TENOR SAXOPHONE IN JAZZ (NEW)

    Randy Greene, Fridays, 10 to 12 noon

    Cactus Room: February 25, March 4, 11, 18, 25, April 1

    The tenor saxophone has been one of the key instruments in jazz. In a sense, the evolution of tenor saxophone style has been a microcosm of the development of jazz from the swing era (1930’s) to the present. This course will highlight the major jazz saxophonists in roughly chronological order, focusing on the style of each and their contributions to the development of jazz.  Some of the musicians we will listen to and discuss are Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Dexter Gordon, Stan Getz, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, and Chris Potter.


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