ILR At SaddleBrooke
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ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERS

The 2020 Winter/Spring Class Overview is available and can be downloaded by clicking on the "List of Classes" link in the menu above. The available classes are also shown below. Note that current classes are shown first, so you may need to scroll down to see future classes.

You must be a subscriber and you must be logged in to see the classes.

Registration for Winter/Spring 2020 classes opened on December 3 at 9am.

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Note: you must be a subscriber to register for a class. If you are not yet a subscriber, please join before trying to register. Also, you must be logged in to register for a class.

Current Classes - information and registration

    • 12 Feb 2020
    • 25 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    20-109 ARAB SPRING (UPDATED REPEAT)

    Sandy McNabb, Wednesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 12, 19, 26 March 4, 18, 25

    This course will explore the events that led to the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt, Tunisia, and Syria, and also ask the question of why the monarchies (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar and Kuwait) escaped the turmoil. The course will also look at the rise of Political Islam and how the Muslim Brotherhood gained and then lost political power. Finally, we will investigate the origins of ISIS in Iraq and Syria and try to understand the objectives of ISIS, Al Qaeda, and El Shabab in their struggle for control of radical Islam.


    • 13 Feb 2020
    • 26 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • HOA 1 Activity Center
    • 1
    Register

    20-110 CHINA AND AMERICA: FACING NEW ECONOMIC, POLITICAL, AND DIPLOMATIC CHALLENGES

    Boyd Bosma, Thursdays 10am-12 noon

    OA1 Activity Center: February 13, 20, 27 March 5, 12, 26

    No international relationships today are more complex or important than the give-and-take between China and the United States. Rising from a position of economic distress little more than thirty years ago, China’s economy has grown exponentially, allowing it to surpass the US on measures of national wealth and prosperity, and it is now challenging our country for economic and cyber dominance not only in its own region but across Asia, Africa, Europe, and around the world. China’s military is newly aggressive, and we are facing new challenges as the US seeks to keep trade routes open in the South China Sea and elsewhere. All this is complicated by the stop-and-go machinations around the US trade war and cyber competition with China. Our future will depend on the diplomatic skills of our own leaders.

    This course will focus on the history, economics, and political and diplomatic issues with China from ancient times to the present day.


    • 17 Feb 2020
    • 23 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 23
    Register

    20-111 Six Gigantic Symphonies of Gustav Mahler

    Punch Howarth, Mondays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16, 23

    Gustav Mahler was a world-class conductor of opera and symphony orchestras who found time to compose huge symphonies. Mahler, who was Czech, was a Germanic Romantic composer.

    This six-week class will focus on six works in the symphony form, covering one work each class.The first three classes will cover symphonies 1-2-3, the Wunderhorn Symphonies where 2 and 3 include vocal forces.The final three classes will include the Ruckert Symphonies 5-6-7 that are pure orchestra works.

    The course will feature five of the works on DVD in order to see as well as hear great orchestras perform. Mahler was the first of several conductors who were extremely demanding of musicians, and his scores include exact details of performance


    • 17 Feb 2020
    • 23 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 23
    Register

    20-112 AMAZING VISUAL SYSTEM (REPEAT)

    Robert Springer, Mondays 2 - 4 pm

    Sonoran Room: February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16, 23

    Many of us believe that our eyes work like a camera. That explanation may be simple, but it is not true.  In fact, the eye works more like a sophisticated computer than a camera, recognizing objects by analyzing their features.

    Visual images come through a blurry lens, pass through a web of blood vessels, and land on a shaking field of receptors in our eyes.  Yet these images look like sharp images to us.  In this class we will examine the stages of visual processing to understand how this happens. We will view interesting demonstrations of many of these stages of processing.

    We will also learn about the errors that the visual system makes.  These errors can result in some amazing optical illusions that we will show and come to understand.

    Finally, this course will also discuss the changes in the visual system that often occur with increasing age and some of the visual problems that older people may experience


    • 18 Feb 2020
    • 17 Mar 2020
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 1
    Register

    20-113 CHINESE CULTURE AND RELIGIONS (UPDATED REPEAT)

    Ann Kuperberg, Tuesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 18, 25 March 3, 10, 17

    Chinese culture has not changed much over 5,000 years in relation to family traditions, education and horoscopes. Medicinal practices, silk-making, pottery & calligraphy are a reflection of that society. This course will cover these topics as well as myths about creation and the spiritual world. We will discuss Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism and how those teachings have affected Chinese leadership and politics in the past and present.


    • 18 Feb 2020
    • 24 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    20-114 TRUTH, JUSTICE AND ACCOUNTABILITY

    Paul Frederickson, Tuesdays 2 - 4 pm

    Sonoran Room: February 18, 25 March 3, 10, 17, 24

    This course will examine numerous historically significant court cases from the past 100 years.  We will use the cases to review and discuss several important individual and societal issues.  Major course topics will include: 1) How do we know right from wrong? 2) What is a lie? 3) How should liars be held accountable? 4) Who should be held accountable for injuries caused by Coca-Cola, hot coffee, guns, tobacco, opioids, and more? 5)  When is discrimination wrong / illegal?  We will use history, philosophy, ethics and law to analyze these complex and controversial topics.


    • 20 Feb 2020
    • 26 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • Cactus Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    20-115 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY (REPEAT)

    Chuck Stump, Thursdays 10 - 12 noon

    Cactus Room: February 20, 27 March 5, 12, 19, 26

    What makes us “tick?” Why do we do what we do or say the things we say? How are we similar to everyone else, and how are we different? Why do children born in the same family and raised by the same parents turn out so differently? Why do identical twins, separated at birth and having no contact with each other until they are well into adulthood, have similar characteristics and interests? These are common questions that arise regarding human personalities and will be explored in this class. A variety of personality theories will also be discussed and application of knowledge regarding personality in daily life will be presented


    • 21 Feb 2020
    • 27 Mar 2020
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room/Cactus Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    20-116 GEOLOGY OF ARIZONA LANDSCAPES (REPEAT)

    Karen Gray, Fridays 10 am - 12 noon

    Cactus Room: February 21, 28 March 6, 13, 27

    Sonoran Room: March 20

    This class will examine the three different geologic regions of Arizona, and then discuss the geology of five areas in detail. The areas are the Catalina Mountains, Tucson Mountains, the Grand Canyon, Sedona and northern Arizona, and several of our beautiful National Parks. There will be three field trips: 1) Catalina State Park about 2 1/2 hrs; 2) Catalina Mountains from the base to the top. (an all day car trip with eight stops); 3) Tucson Mountains which includes four short hikes (some with elevation) to examine features of the volcanic range. This will be an all day excursion.

    This class has optional field trips. Participants will be required to sign a waiver.


    • 28 Feb 2020
    • 20 Mar 2020
    • 4 sessions
    • Sonoran Room / HOA1 Activity Center
    • 1
    Register

    20-117 ASTRONOMY'S GREATEST DISCOVERIES

    Lockwood Carlson, Fridays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room: February 28; HOA1 Activity Center: March 6, 13, 20, 

    Advances in telescope and camera technology, both land and space based, have resulted in dramatic advances in astrophysics and cosmology.  This course will cover these advances and explain the science behind the “headlines.”  No math required.


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