ILR At SaddleBrooke
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ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERS

Registration for fall 2020 classes is now open and classes are shown below. You may need to scroll down to see all the classes.

For a description of all the classes click on List of Classes in the menu bar above.

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Note: you must be a subscriber to register for a class. If you are not yet a subscriber, please join before trying to register. Also, you must be logged in to register for a class.

Current Classes - information and registration

    • 21 Sep 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 26 Oct 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    Register
    Andrea Molberg, Mondays 2 - 4 pm

    September 21, October 5, 12, 19, 26

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.  Please register each person in the household individually.

    As you know, conflict is both difficult and common.  In this course, you will get a practical understanding of what sparks conflict and what makes it difficult to manage.  Additionally, specific approaches, tips, and skills for effectively handling tough interactions will be discussed. Classes will focus on choosing a conflict management style for the situation, eliminating conflict resolution barriers, reducing defensiveness, using helpful words and phrases, and finding workable solutions to improve relationships

    • 24 Sep 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 22 Oct 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    Registration is closed

    Mike Carran, Thursdays 10 am – 12 noon

    September 24, October 1, 8, 15, 22

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.  Please register each person in the household individually.

    The Dust Bowl is the name given to a period of drought and environmental catastrophe that occurred in the late 1920’s to the late 1930’s in the American West and Canada.  The class will cover the reasons the settlement of the west took so much longer than the settlement of the eastern parts of the U.S., the technological and political changes that allowed settlement and ultimately caused the Dust Bowl.  We will read and discuss the novel, The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck.


    • 25 Sep 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 23 Oct 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    Register

    Byron Cotter, Fridays 10 am - 12 noon

    September 25, October 2, 9, 16, 23

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.  Please register each person in the household individually.

    From the Cambrian explosion of marine invertebrate animals some 541 million years ago, to the Permian-Triassic mass extinction 252 million years ago, the Paleozoic Era encompassed the greatest diversification of life forms in Earth’s long history.  Invertebrate life forms diversified explosively in the oceans and vertebrates appeared.  Fish evolved from “minnows” into monsters of the ancient oceans.  Plants colonized land and evolved into great forests.

    Invertebrates and then vertebrates colonized land, too.  Eight-foot-long millipedes roamed the coal forests of the Carboniferous period, as giant insects with wingspans over two feet long soared above.  Reptiles emerged and evolved into bizarre forms like the sail-backed Dimetrodon of the Permian period.  This course covers the Paleozoic evolution of both plants and animals in the context of “evolutionary innovations”, combinations of traits that conferred major survival advantages.


    • 06 Oct 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 13 Oct 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 2 sessions
    • ZOOM
    Register

    Tom Oetinger, Tuesdays 3-5 pm

    October 6, 13

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions. Please register each person in the household individually.

    First Session: Participants will be instructed in the Intentional Method of Wine Tasting.  This four-step technique is designed to assist individuals interested in gaining a better understanding of the basic elements of wine and aid them in determining their preferences among the many styles of wine. 

    Second Session: Participants will learn about the meaning and differences between ‘Old World’ and ‘New World’ styles of wine.  Students will be afforded an opportunity to sample a wine that falls into the category of each style and attempt to identify the primary characteristics of each style.

    Participant Requirements:  The students will purchase two bottles of wine for each session from the list of recommended wines provided.  Each student should have two wine glasses.  These glasses should have a stem and be made of glass or crystal that is free from decoration.  Handouts will be sent to each participant in PDF format and should be printed prior to each session. 




    • 04 Nov 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 09 Dec 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 1
    Register

    Nell Brownell

    Wednesdays 10 am - 12 noon November 4, 11, 18, December 2, 9

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.  Please register each person in the household individually.

    Perhaps no other region of our country has inspired as many stories, myths, and legends as the American West.  But along with the 'cowboys and Indians', the prospectors and outlaws, the western landscapes of the American continent are filled with complexity.  The region west of the Mississippi is considered the most culturally and racially diverse of the United States and has been the context for many of our nation's most important issues, such as the struggle for indigenous rights, questions of resource management, competing visions of government, and the role of immigration.  Please join Dr. Nell Brownell for a five-week exploration that will include lecture, video, and discussion; short readings will be assigned but no tests required
    • 05 Nov 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 17 Dec 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 6 sessions
    • ZOOM
    Register

    Chuck Stump, Thursdays 10 am - 12 noon

    November 5, 12, 19, December 3, 10, 17

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.  Please register each person in the household individually

    Almost everyone has, or will, fly in a commercial airplane.  However, only a few flyers (or future flyers) understand the basic concepts of flight and how airplane operations are managed.  What makes an airplane fly and how does it stay in the air, even when weighing several tons?  What keeps aircraft in flight from running into each other, and how do airplanes get from one place to another?  How does Air Traffic Control work?  How is safety ensured?  This course will examine these, and other factors involved in aircraft operation.  This class may include a field trip to the Pima Air and Space Museum depending on the COVID 19 status.


    • 09 Nov 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 07 Dec 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    Register

    David Stegink, Monday 10 am - 12 noon

    November 9, 16, 23, 30 December 7

    Masks will be required.  The maximum enrollment will be 15 students per HOA guidelines.

    Participants will be required to sign a waiver to cover risks related to Covid-19. 

    Gustave Flaubert, known for his vivid and brutal honesty, his precise and objective style, and his rich and complex character portrayals, will be studied to explore the elements of his art, thought, and work. We will read his important novel, Sentimental Education (1869), praised for its vast panorama of life in mid-19th century France, and its impressive analyses of character. We will use the Penguin Classics edition, which is a 1964 translation by Robert Baldic, and revised in 2004 by Geoffrey Wall. The class is asked to read, for the first session, the Introduction, and the text through Chapter 4 of Part I. A further syllabus will be distributed at the first session.

    Flaubert's other main novel, and probably more well known, Madame Bovary, will not be read, but excerpts of an exceptional DVD production will be viewed. The class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with the overall goal to understand, assess and evaluate the nature and quality of Flaubert's writing.

    This course will depend on room availability which the HOA2 Board is reviewing, and may have to be cancelled at short notice.  If cancelled, registration fees will be refunded. 

    • 10 Nov 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 08 Dec 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    Registration is closed

    Linda Griffin, Tuesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    November 10, 17, 24, December 1, 8

    Masks will be required.  The maximum enrollment will be 15 students per HOA guidelines.

    Participants will be required to sign a waiver to cover risks related to Covid-19

    Noel Coward was one of England’s most notable 20th Century dramatists. He was also a composer, director, screenwriter, actor, singer, and even a Secret Service worker. This course will review his multi-faceted life and career and focus on some of his plays. We will examine in depth Blithe Spirit, Private Lives, Hay Fever, and Fallen Angels. I will peruse his musical career and present some of his most famous songs. The focus will be to ascertain why this person is known by so many in so many fields, and to solidify his place in dramatic literature.  Students should purchase the book, Noel Coward:  Three Plays [Blithe Spirit, Hay Fever, and Private Lives], Grove Press, 1965, from Amazon.

    This course will depend on room availability which the HOA2 Board is reviewing, and may have to be cancelled at short notice.  If cancelled, registration fees will be refunded. There is a realistic possibility that this course will be taught with Zoom if the room is not available.

    • 10 Nov 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 08 Dec 2020
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    Register

    Lockwood Carlson, Tuesdays 2 - 4 pm

    November 10, 17, 24, December 1, 8

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions. Please register each person in the household individually. 

    This course will describe and explain the key issues facing physics today.  Our deep understanding of the universe, from tiny quanta to galaxies, is founded on measurements and observations.  They have expanded the scope of our explanatory power but have led to major challenges to our understanding.  These have enabled us to articulate what we don’t know.  Are these dead ends or rich opportunities for more discovery and wonder?  We will consider these topics:  What’s the matter with Dark Matter?  Where does Dark Energy come from?  The enigmas of Black Holes, Quantum Mechanics (still spooky after 100 years), Time Zero—the shrouded mystery of the Big Bang, and the really hard questions—strings, loops, and quantum gravity. 


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