ILR At SaddleBrooke
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ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERS

Registration for 2021 winter-spring classes will open in December and classes will be shown below when registration opens. You may need to scroll down to see all the classes. YOU CANNOT REGISTER UNTIL REGISTRATION OPENS. You will receive an email notification of the registration opening date.

For a description of all the classes click on List of Classes in the menu bar above.

You must be a subscriber and you must be logged in to register for a class.

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Note: you must be a subscriber to register for a class. If you are not yet a subscriber, please join before trying to register. Also, you must be logged in to register for a class.

Current Classes - information and registration

    • 11 Jan 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 15 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 6 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 65
    Register

    Boyd Bosma, Mondays 10 am to 12 noon

    ZOOM: January 11, 18, 25, February 1, 8, 15

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.

    Please register each person in the household individually.

    No international relationships are more complex or important than the give and take between China and the United States.  Rising from a position of economic distress little more than thirty years ago, China’s economy has grown exponentially, allowing it to surpass the US on measures of national wealth and prosperity.  It is now challenging our country for economic and cyber dominance not only in its own region but across Asia, Africa, Europe and around the world.  China’s military is newly aggressive and we are facing new challenges as the US seeks to keep trade routes open in the South China Sea and elsewhere.  All this is complicated by the stop and go machinations around the US trade war and cyber competition with China.  Our future will depend on the diplomatic skills of our own leaders.  This course will focus on the history, economics, and political and diplomatic issues with China from ancient times to the present day. 


    • 12 Jan 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 09 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 2
    Register

    Linda Griffin, Tuesdays, 10 am to 12 noon

    ZOOM: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 9

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.

    Please register each person in the household individually.

    This course will present an overview study of three distinct periods of Mark Twain’s writing.  In the first period he wrote many humorous short stories, in the second he wrote many humorous yet insightful novels, and in the third he wrote several stories and essays that present a rather dark view of mankind.  We will look at several short stories, analyzing his humor and writing techniques.  Then we will study the novel Huckleberry Finn, analyzing his views on American mores and values.  We will also discuss two of his major novels:  Roughing It, and The Innocents Abroad.  Lastly, we will review some of Twain’s writings from the end of his life and career (handouts).  No prior literature courses are required to understand and enjoy this course. 

    Purchase from any source the novel, Huckleberry Finn (or check out a copy from a library).  Secondly, buy and read EITHER Roughing It, or The Innocents Abroad (any source).  Questions on these will be on handouts. 


    • 13 Jan 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 17 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 6 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 47
    Register

    Sharon Cotter, Wednesdays 10 am-12 noon

    ZOOM:  January 13, 20, 27, February 3, 10, 17

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.

    Please register each person in the household individually.

    Many of us think we know a lot about the history of the world… the rise of civilization in Mesopotamia, the Romans, the Greeks, the Chinese, early India, but that is only part of the story. South America has a history that goes back at least 10,000 years and perhaps as much as 30,000 years. It is not just Machu Pichu--one of the earliest civilizations developed at around 8,000 feet! The South Americans were not defeated by the Spanish Conquistadors, but rather by the diseases they brought to the new continent.  While the Amazon had over a million people when the first Spanish explorer came, by the time the conquistadors came, over 90% of the population had died from those diseases.  Some of the most amazing things you will learn about this lost history is that while they did not have a written language, the people of South America built some of the most beautiful cities in the ancient world.  Their agricultural science was way ahead of most cultures up until the current era.  Pottery and textiles were some of the best in the world. The architecture that was developed would withstand virtually any earthquake.  There were over 24,800 miles of roads created in some of the most challenging mountains in the world.  The earliest mummies in South America date to 5050 AD, 2000 years before the mummies in Egypt.  This and many more amazing facts will be included in this fascinating course on the Pre-History of South America.


    • 14 Jan 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 18 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 6 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 60
    Register

    Mel Durchslag, Thursdays 10 am-12 noon

    ZOOM: January 14, 21, 28, February 4, 11, 18

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.

    Please register each person in the household individually.

    This course, which will consist of six sessions, will explore how all three branches of our federal government, and even the states, have responded to times of crisis, mostly war or the threat of war.  Except for the first and last sessions, the course will be organized more or less chronologically, starting with the Alien and Sedition Laws of 1798, and extending to the exercise of presidential power during the “war on terrorism”.  Between those events, we will look at Lincoln’s suspension of the writ of habeas corpus during the Civil War, assaults on free speech during and immediately after World War I, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, and the McCarthy era.  The last session will be devoted to a discussion of what might be described as the politization of the federal judiciary generally and the Supreme Court particularly, the crisis being a crisis of confidence.  While we look at each branch of the federal government, because this is essentially a course in constitutional law, the focus, where appropriate, will be on the response of the United States Supreme Court both to legislative restrictions on free speech and the exercise of presidential power as “Commander in Chief”. 


    • 22 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 22 Mar 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    Mike Carran, Mondays 2-4 pm

    ZOOM: February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.

    Please register each person in the household individually.

    The modern short story is often credited to Edgar Allen Poe who argued that a short story should be brief enough to be finished in one sitting and should have one effect.  We will be reading and discussing two short stories for each class except the first and last.  Each of the short stories is available on-line and most can be read in 15 – 20 minutes.  The class will be discussion-oriented with an exploration of both the form and the function of each work through a series of discussion questions provided by the instructor. 


    • 24 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 24 Mar 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 5 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 23
    Register

    Joan Elder, Wednesdays 10-11:30 am

    ZOOM: February 24, March 3, 10, 17, 24

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.

    Please register each person in the household individually.

    This class will provide factual information about the lives of the wives of United States Presidents, starting with Martha Washington. Their families of origin, education, marital relationships, role as First Lady, and life after that role will be discussed.  Most participants are more familiar with the First Ladies who held that title in our lifetime.  However, the interesting facts and even some shocking details about early First Ladies, about whom we know much less, are fascinating. 


    • 25 Feb 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 01 Apr 2021
    • (UTC-07:00)
    • 6 sessions
    • ZOOM
    • 71
    Register

    David Cook, Thursdays 2-4 pm

    ZOOM: February 25, March 4, 11, 18, 25, April 1

    Registrants will receive an e-mail containing information about joining the course sessions.  Please register each person in the household individually.

    If it isn’t grown, it has to be mined!  Humans have been using “mining” to extract items to help them grow and harvest the food they ate, provide improved housing conditions, and facilitate their expressions of culture from 10,000 BC to the present.  Recent developments and the necessity to protect the environment have led to increased steps in mining reclamation and environmental design.  Arizona has been among the leaders in exploring, developing, and reclaiming mining sites for over 400 years.  We will study the sites, the successes, and the failures throughout history. 



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