ILR At SaddleBrooke
  • Home
  • Register Here

ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERS

Registration for winter/spring 2019 classes has begun. Classes are listed below.

For a pdf list of the classes that are offered, click on List Of Classes above.

To insure that our emails do not go into your spam or junk folder, add this address to your contacts list:   admin@sbilr.org

Note: you must be a subscriber to register for a class. If you are not yet a subscriber, please join before trying to register. Also, you must be logged in to register for a class.

Current Classes - information and registration

    • 01 Nov 2018
    • 13 Dec 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • HOA1 Activity Center
    Registration is closed

    18-308 THE VIKINGS  (A REPEAT)

    Ken Lund, Thursdays 10 am - noon

    HOA1 Activity Center, 11/1, 11/8, 11/29, 12/6, 12/13

    Were the Vikings pagan barbarians, pillaging and killing monks in monasteries? Could they also have been traders, explorers and colonizers? For 300 years they traveled from Scandinavia to the Mediterranean interacting with many nations and cultures and left a lasting impact. These intrepid Norsemen discovered North America before Columbus was even born. Participants will explore the Viking culture, life style, gods, and wars. Archeological evidence is continuing to provide additional information about the Vikings. The class will separate myth from fact and contrast reality with the images created in the movies and on television.

     


    • 06 Nov 2018
    • 11 Dec 2018
    • 6 sessions
    • MV Sonoran Room
    Register

    18-312 MILES DAVIS, PART 2

    Randy Greene, Tuesdays 2 - 4 pm

    Sonoran Room, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4, 12/11

    In the first part of this course, Miles Davis’ career was traced up to his iconic album, Kind of Blue, recorded in 1959, roughly the mid-point of his career. While Kind of Blue is a unique and seminal album, Miles Davis continued to expand and explore many exciting musical ideas after this.

     

    In this course, after a review of Miles Davis’ career up to and including Kind of Blue, participants will learn about his subsequent works. Time will be spent discussing his last and probably greatest recording with Gil Evans, Sketches of Spain as well as his collaboration with John Coltrane including the beginnings of Coltrane’s career as a leader. After that, we will examine the various quintets he leads until he assembled his second great quintet featuring tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams. This quintet played together for the better part of the 1960’s and developed and expanded his musical vocabulary. Finally, in the late 1960’s and for the rest of his career, Davis explored and developed amplified, electronic music, which pushed his music in a radical new direction.


    • 07 Nov 2018
    • 12 Dec 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • MV Sonoran Room
    Registration is closed

    18-313 CSI SADDLEBROOKE  (A REPEAT)

    Bart Epstein, Wednesdays 10 am - noon

    Sonoran Room, 11/7, 11/14, 11/28, 12/5, 12/12

    The instructor, a forensic scientist for the State of Minnesota for 32 years, will present a survey of what can and cannot be done in a forensic science laboratory. The class will introduce the participants to different types of evidence and their value as well as how they are used in court. Material will be presented by lecture and demonstration as well as participants actually doing some forensic work in class. Numerous actual cases will be presented and discussed.


    • 09 Nov 2018
    • 14 Dec 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • MV Cactus Room
    Register

    18-314 LITERARY GENIUS OF LEO TOLSTOY

    David Stegink, Fridays 10 am - noon

    Cactus Room, 11/9, 11/16, 11/30, 12/7, 12/14

    Leo Tolstoy's life, times (19th c. Russia), and works will be explored with the objective of developing an understanding of his mind and art, an appreciation of his literary output, and an assessment of his unique contribution to literature, and "realism," which made for his being considered one of the world's greatest novelists. Participants will read and discuss Anna Karenina (including DVD viewing of a considerable portion of a wonderful BBC production). Please get the following text as soon as possible and begin reading early on (it's 817 pages!): the Penguin Classic,  translated by Pevear and Volokhonsky.


    • 20 Nov 2018
    • 18 Dec 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • HOA1 Activity Center
    Register

    18-315 WORLD OF DINOSAURS  (AN UPDATED REPEAT)

    Byron Cotter, Tuesdays 10 am - noon

    HOA1 Activity Center, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18

    Dinosaurs are the iconic monsters of legends, cartoons, and movies, but there is also a well established and growing science base that reveals how they lived in and interacted with the world of their era.   This course surveys that science base, starting with the first dinosaurs’ appearance in the Triassic period, some 240 million years ago, to the mass extinction 66 million years ago that wiped them all out, except for birds, today’s surviving dinosaurs.  The course also explores many of their contemporaries - archosaurs, early mammals, the flying reptilian pterosaurs, and various “sea monsters”.  Also covered are the “bone hunters”, the paleontologists who have traveled the world finding the fossil remains of these creatures.


    • 07 Jan 2019
    • 04 Feb 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 1
    Register

    19-101 THE ARAB SPRING (AN UPDATED REPEAT)

    Sandy McNabb, Mondays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room, January 7, 14, 21, 28, February 4, 11

    In 2011, the Middle East was rocked by revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, and Syria. Dictators who had ruled for decades were toppled by peaceful protests. Then in 2014, a savage Jihadist group, ISIS, declared the Islamic Caliphate in Iraq and Syria.

    This course will provide a framework for understanding these events. Participants first look at Islam, including the differences between Sunni and Shia Muslims. Next, the January 25th Revolution in Egypt: why did people go to the streets and what has been the results five years later. Then the discussion will turn to the monarchies (Saudi Arabia, Qatar, UAE and Kuwait) and ask how they escaped the turmoil of the Arab Spring. In Syria, the question of why a civil war broke out and why Syria became the breeding ground for ISIS will be explored.  Finally, the class will investigate ISIS: who they are, what are their objectives, and why are they attracting so many young Muslims.


    • 07 Jan 2019
    • 11 Feb 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 23
    Register

    19-102 MINERALS AND GEMS (A REPEAT)

    Harlan Clare, Mondays 2-4 pm

    Sonoran Room, January 7, 14, 21, 28, February 4, 11

    Minerals and gems can be beautiful, but did you know that many of the products you use today come from common minerals? Come join us and learn about common and not so common minerals. You will participate in hands-on activities and demonstrations while learning how and why minerals are different. See unusual properties of some minerals demonstrated— fluorescence, phosphorescence, radioactivity, pleochroism, and magnetism, among others. You will also learn about gemstones, including how gems are valued. As an optional experience, the instructor will lead a tour of the Tucson Mineral, Gem and Fossil Showcase. Participants attending the tour will be required to sign a waiver.


    • 08 Jan 2019
    • 05 Feb 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    19-103 ’TIS IRELAND: IRELAND A CLOSER LOOK

    Linda Griffin, Tuesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room, January 8, 15, 22, 29, February 5

    The land of Ireland continues to fascinate tourists and scholars alike. In this course you will learn about (1) the differing geographical features and a brief history; (2) its legends, myths, and story writers; (3) its playwrights; (4) some famous and infamous women; (5) its captivating music. You will be required to buy one book: OUTSIDE MULLINGAR, a play by John Patrick Shanley (2014; available from Dramatists Play Service). Other written materials will be given out in class.


    • 08 Jan 2019
    • 12 Feb 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    19-104 ANXIETY AND REBELLION IN THE 1950’S

    Randy Greene, Tuesdays 2 - 4 pm

    Sonoran Room, January 8, 15, 22, 29, February 5, 12

    After World War Two, there was a general mood of optimism. The good guys won the war and the economy was flourishing.  The American Dream seemed to be open to everyone. There were, however, some dark clouds forming and some indications that something was wrong beneath the surface.

     

    In this course participants will begin by reading Arthur Millers play Death of a Salesman. In this play Miller identifies many of the issues that pervaded the literature of the 1950s, especially the problems both with achieving the American Dream and with the dream itself. The rest of the course will focus on the rebellion against American culture itself by a group of young writers, especially Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, identified as the Beat Generation.  In both style and content, their writings challenged the established values in radical and often offensive ways. The last class will look at the works of Abstract Expressionist painters who in many ways did visually what the Beat writers did in literature.


    • 09 Jan 2019
    • 06 Feb 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 3
    Register
    19-105 GROUNDBREAKING ARTISTS THROUGH THE YEARS, PART II

    Laurie Brussel, Wednesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room, January 9, 16, 23, 30, February 6

    “Groundbreaking Artists Through the Years Part I” was given last January and has led to a follow-up course with five new extraordinary and talented artists. Attendees will now learn about, in chronological order, Michelangelo, Edgar Degas and his ballet dancers, Picasso, Edward Hopper, and Jackson Pollack. With the help of videos, detailed printouts, and basically a love of Art History, the instructor will delve into these artist's lives and their artwork as well as explaining how these five creative individuals became the well-known and admired figures of our art world.

     

    Each week attendees will zero in on a different artist and each class will contain a review of the past week, an introduction to the current week's artist, an informative video, and time for a group discussion.

     

    Laurie is a professional artist and instructor in Saddlebrooke with an agent and publisher on Long Island, New York. Participants will get to experience her point of view on these creative individuals not only as a learned lecturer but as another professional artist.

     


    • 11 Jan 2019
    • 08 Feb 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Cactus Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    19-106 HUMAN EVOLUTION

    Louise Grabell, Fridays 10 am - 12 noon

    Cactus Room, January 11, 18, 25, February 1, 8 

    Human Evolution is a five-part exploration into the origins of Homo sapiens, starting with the extensive fossil evidence found on the continent of Africa.  Understanding human evolution also requires some understanding of the basic concepts of evolution as a process, and discussion of whether humans are, indeed, still evolving.  The mechanism for change in all organisms is genetic, and in that light, some time will be devoted to show how DNA can change, and how the environment played an influential role in determining the qualities of the modern-day human species.  Participants will gain an understanding of and appreciation for the outcomes of human evolution and our ancestral heritage through a close examination of the fossil record and historical migrations of our closest human relatives.


    • 11 Jan 2019
    • 15 Feb 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • HOA 1 Activity Center
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    19-107 GLOBALISM VERSUS NATIONALISM

    John Somers, Fridays 10 am - 12 noon

    HOA1 Activity Center, January 11, 18, February 1, 8, 15

    This course will lead to an understanding of the complexities of globalization and its benefits and costs. From the end of WWII until very recently, the US has promoted the expansion of trade, trade treaties and the integration of the European economies. Most economists support these policies. Globalization has led to an increase in world wealth but there have been winners and losers. The winners are the worlds consumers who with expanded trade have greater access to goods and services, often at lower prices. The losers are the workers and businesses displaced by rising imports. In addition, globalization has led to an increase in the flow of workers and immigrants across national borders.

     

    In the last number of years there has been a negative reaction to the loss of jobs, rising immigration and a perceived loss of national sovereignty. These concerns have led to more nationalistic governments in Europe and Asia. Since the election of Donald Trump, the US has also retrenched from global cooperation.

     


    • 18 Feb 2019
    • 25 Mar 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 24
    Register

    19-108 ADVERTISING AND CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY (AN UPDATED REPEAT)

    Marv Goldberg, Mondays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room, February 18, 25, March 4, 11, 18, 25

    This course reviews: 1) the understandings advertisers have developed of the consumer’s psychology and behavior and 2) the strategies they use based on these understandings to influence the consumer’s perceptions, knowledge, attitudes and actions towards the brands/products they sell. Attention is paid to the science/research that underpins these understandings/strategies. Central to this approach is the view that a key role of advertisers/marketers is to bridge the “gaps” that inevitably exist between the seller and the buyer. These include, as an example, the gap in experience and perspective that a 45-year-old marketer has in trying to “reach” and sell a product to either a 20-year-old or a 70-year-old. Classes will be guided by power point presentations with print ads and TV commercials used extensively to illustrate the points covered.


    • 19 Feb 2019
    • 19 Mar 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 1
    Register

    19-109 IRVING BERLIN: ICON OF AMERICAN POPULAR SONGWRITING

    Gail Nelli, Tuesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room, February 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19

    Despite his impoverished early childhood and lack of formal music training, Irving Berlin played by ear and became a prolific songwriter of almost 1,500 songs. When asked to define Berlin’s place in American music, fellow music composer and friend, Jerome Kern replied, “Irving Berlin has no ‘place’ in American music—Irving Berlin IS American music.”  The sessions will explore the family background and early musical influences that started Berlin on his songwriting journey.  Then participants will take a close look at Berlin’s emerging song-writing style as he promoted popular songs in Tin Pan Alley compositions, the Broadway stage and Hollywood films.

     


    • 19 Feb 2019
    • 26 Mar 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    19-110 GEOLOGY OF ARIZONA’S BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES

    Karen Gray, Tuesdays 2 - 4 pm

    Sonoran Room, February 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 26

    This course will encompass discussions of the geologic events and processes that formed Arizona’s diverse geology. There will be a special emphasis on the Tucson Mountains, the Catalina Mountains and the Grand Canyon.  Three optional field trips will be included: 1) To Catalina State Park, a short drive from SaddleBrooke, 2) To Summerhaven, at the top of the Catalina Mountains, and 3) Four short hikes through the Tucson Mountains. The dates and times for the field trips will be determined by class consensus. Each participant is required to sign a waiver in order to participate in any of the field trips.


    • 20 Feb 2019
    • 27 Mar 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Sonoran room
    • 17
    Register

    19-111 OUR AMAZING VISUAL SYSTEM (A REPEAT)

    Robert Springer, Wednesdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Sonoran Room, February 20, 27, March 6, 13, 20, 27

    This course discusses the incredible human visual perception system. While the eye is often simply compared to a camera, in this course participants will learn that the visual system is, in fact, very different than that of a camera. Instead of a cameras sharp lens, humans actually have two low-quality lenses. The images that enter the eye travel through a substantial number of blood vessels before getting to the eye's retina. Amazingly, the visual system erases these blood vessels from view. In addition, the retina has a hole in it that the visual system somehow fills in. The retinal film contains about 130 million receptors but contains only about 1 million nerves connecting those receptors to the brain. The class will discuss why there are so many receptors for each nerve and the fascinating image processing that results from this interconnection of many receptors to few nerves.

     

    The human eye constantly shakes. The eye must shake or the image seen will disappear. Interestingly, images are not seen all at once. Participants will discuss how the visual system breaks down images into pieces and gathers information on edges, motion, direction, and color for each piece. Then attendees will see how the system puts all these pieces back together into the complete "picture" that is seen at any moment. The course will conclude with discussions of visual problems that occur as we age.


    • 21 Feb 2019
    • 28 Mar 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Cactus Room
    • 21
    Register

    19-112 WINNING THE DREAM (AN UPDATED REPEAT)

    Boyd Bosma, Thursdays 10 am - 12 noon

    Cactus Room, February 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 28

    Since the beginning, our country has considered itself a beacon of human and civil rights in the world, but the ideals of the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution have not always applied to all of our people. Achieving the promises of the Bill of Rights and the ideals that made our nation great has required constant effort and sacrifice. Our generation took part in one of the most amazing and consequential social revolutions in our nations history. This course will review some of the key people and events that helped to change our nation, with emphasis on the civil rights movement of half a century ago and the achievements it helped bring about that changed all our lives. The course is led by a participant in many of the struggles of that time.

     


    • 22 Feb 2019
    • 22 Mar 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Cactus Room
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    19-113 GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY IN THE ARTS AND SCIENCE

    Fran Berman, Fridays, 10 am - 12 noon

    Cactus Room, February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22

    Participants will become familiar with Greek and Roman gods and goddesses and their influences in the arts and even science. Each week we will see examples of famous works of art (paintings, sculptures, literature, constellations) and learn about the Greek and Roman mythology behind them.


    • 25 Feb 2019
    • 25 Mar 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Sonoran Room
    • 3
    Register

    19-114 FINDING COMMON GROUND: MANAGING CONFLICT

    Andrea Molberg, Mondays 2 - 4 pm

    Sonoran Room,  February 25, March 4, 11, 18, 25

    As you know, conflict is both difficult and common. In this course, you will get a practical understanding of what sparks conflict and what makes it difficult to manage. Additionally,  specific approaches, tips, and skills for effectively handing tough interactions will be discussed. Classes will focus on choosing a conflict management style for the situation, eliminating conflict resolution barriers, reducing defensiveness, using helpful words and phrases, and finding workable solutions to improve relationships.


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software